Start Consequences of dating violence

Consequences of dating violence

Findings from VACS enable countries to better allocate limited resources to develop, launch, and evaluate violence prevention programs and child protection systems.

Violence is defined by the World Health Organization as "the intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community, which either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment, or deprivation", although the group acknowledges that the inclusion of "the use of power" in its definition expands on the conventional understanding of the word.

This definition involves intentionality with the committing of the act itself, irrespective of the outcome it produces.

It’s very common to hear about violence against women and about male batterers rather than about violence against men and about female batterers.

Like it or not, experts that do not cherry pick their data find a fairly even split when the general public is polled in various ways.

He called a hotline for a battered womens program and asked about services for men, explaining that he was experiencing violence at the hands of a female.

The hotline worker said, “You should be in jail.” The officer restated that he needed help because his wife was violent. In a recent article in the San Diego Metro Weekly domestic violence was mentioned in the context of the California Supreme Court ruling in favor of gay marriage, regarding gay divorce.

The Plan pays particular attention to sexual violence, the vulnerability of girls, and the health consequences of violence.

To see results, Tanzania is launching several new programs and policies, including: In addition, CDC's office in Tanzania has identified the "Families Matter!

Preventing Dating Violence Dating violence can happen to any teen regardless of gender, race, socio-economic status, or whether or not they have experience with dating.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 4 adolescents experiences verbal, physical, emotional, or sexual abuse from a dating partner each year. Dating violence includes any behavior that is used to manipulate, gain control, gain power; cause fear, or make a dating partner feel bad about himself or herself.

However, generally, anything that is excited in an injurious or damaging way may be described as violent even if not meant to be violence (by a person and against a person).