Start Radiometric dating uncertainty

Radiometric dating uncertainty

Mountains, erosion, and variations in climate were considered to be punishment for the sins committed by humanity.

To date a radioactive rock, geologists first measure the “sand grains” in the top glass bowl (the parent radioisotope, such as uranium-238 or potassium-40).

They also measure the sand grains in the bottom bowl (the daughter isotope, such as lead-206 or argon-40, respectively).

But last Sunday, her Bible teacher stated emphatically that God made Earth only six thousand years ago. The age assigned to the fossils in front of her seems to contradict the creation account, and Janet’s heartbeats accelerate at the implication. Credible answers to common misconceptions about radiometric dating and a proper understanding of Scripture can help people like Janet reconcile creation accounts regarding the age of Earth.

Scientists agree that radiometric-dating techniques offer the most concrete evidence of any dating system for answering questions about the age of Earth.

Yet this view is based on a misunderstanding of how radiometric dating works.

Part 1 (in the previous issue) explained how scientists observe unstable atoms changing into stable atoms in the present.

Strata Thickness- In the late 1800s, a British geologist estimated that 75 million years has lapsed since the beginning of the Cambrian.

This estimate was based upon the maximum known thickness of strata (from Cambrian to present) divided by the average rate of sedimentation in modern environments. Joly used the salinity of ocean water to determine the age of the earth.

Part 2 explains how scientists run into problems when they make assumptions about what happened .

An hourglass is a helpful analogy to explain how geologists calculate the ages of rocks.

We are told that of all the radiometric dates that are measured, only a few percent are anomalous.